vilakins: (books)

I wasn't going to do this because I just don't have good answers for a lot of the questions. But I decided I do have enough to make it worthwhile.

20 questions )

Book meme

2 May 2009 12:51 pm
vilakins: (books)

At last, a book meme that doesn't ask me questions I can't answer, like what my favourite book is. This one's from [livejournal.com profile] communicator.

11 questions and my answers )

Book meme

2 May 2009 12:51 pm
vilakins: (books)

At last, a book meme that doesn't ask me questions I can't answer, like what my favourite book is. This one's from [livejournal.com profile] communicator.

11 questions and my answers )

100 books

21 Feb 2009 11:16 am
vilakins: (books)
From [livejournal.com profile] vandonovan, another book list.

The BBC allegedly believes most people will have only read 6 of the 100 books here:
How do your reading habits stack up? [bold those books you've read in their entirety, italicize the ones you started but didn't finish]


Really? Only six? Actually, given how few of my RL acquaintances read novels, I suppose it's a believable average.

I've read 55 )

100 books

21 Feb 2009 11:16 am
vilakins: (books)
From [livejournal.com profile] vandonovan, another book list.

The BBC allegedly believes most people will have only read 6 of the 100 books here:
How do your reading habits stack up? [bold those books you've read in their entirety, italicize the ones you started but didn't finish]


Really? Only six? Actually, given how few of my RL acquaintances read novels, I suppose it's a believable average.

I've read 55 )
vilakins: (books)
A book meme from [livejournal.com profile] sallymn; an interesting one because I get to comment on the books I've read.

1) Copy and paste the list into your own journal.
2) Mark those you have read however you want.
3) Feel free to tell your friends what you thought of them.


I've bolded those I've read, or read most of in the case of series, struck out those I disliked, and put question marks under those I've never heard of. Do tell me about those if you think they're worth reading.

The list and my thoughts )
vilakins: (books)
A book meme from [livejournal.com profile] sallymn; an interesting one because I get to comment on the books I've read.

1) Copy and paste the list into your own journal.
2) Mark those you have read however you want.
3) Feel free to tell your friends what you thought of them.


I've bolded those I've read, or read most of in the case of series, struck out those I disliked, and put question marks under those I've never heard of. Do tell me about those if you think they're worth reading.

The list and my thoughts )

Book meme

26 Jun 2008 09:36 am
vilakins: (books)

Another book meme, copied from a few people now. I'm not sure where the list comes from, but it has a couple of double-ups. I've changed it slightly.

1) Bold those you have read.
2) Italicise those you intend to read.
3) Underline the books you love.
4) Strike out those you dislike.

Book list )

Book meme

26 Jun 2008 09:36 am
vilakins: (books)

Another book meme, copied from a few people now. I'm not sure where the list comes from, but it has a couple of double-ups. I've changed it slightly.

1) Bold those you have read.
2) Italicise those you intend to read.
3) Underline the books you love.
4) Strike out those you dislike.

Book list )

vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, the Telegraph's 50 best cult books. I gather their criterion is that all have the power to inspire, and I quote one paragraph:

Cult books include some of the most cringemaking collections of bilge ever collected between hard covers. But they also include many of the key texts of modern feminism; some of the best journalism and memoirs; some of the most entrancing and original novels in the canon.
I think the last bit applies to the 9 of the 10 I've read that are novels, but I wouldn't call them cult books myself. If you're interested, the Telegraph's comments on each are worth the read.

The list with the ones I've read bolded )

vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, the Telegraph's 50 best cult books. I gather their criterion is that all have the power to inspire, and I quote one paragraph:

Cult books include some of the most cringemaking collections of bilge ever collected between hard covers. But they also include many of the key texts of modern feminism; some of the best journalism and memoirs; some of the most entrancing and original novels in the canon.
I think the last bit applies to the 9 of the 10 I've read that are novels, but I wouldn't call them cult books myself. If you're interested, the Telegraph's comments on each are worth the read.

The list with the ones I've read bolded )

vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] kerravonsen: Grab the nearest book, open to page 123, find the fifth sentence. Then post the next three sentences.

From Autumn Term by Antonia Forest:

She said hopefully: "I thought, you see, that you might be Falsely Accused and that I, as the Headmistress's Niece, could Exert my Influence to Clear Your Name."
Despite herself, Nicola grinned.
"Well, I'm not and you can't and I don't want to talk about it."
I was named after Nicola Marlow, and when I was about 10 or 11 (younger than the twins anyway) I read Autumn Term and loved my namesake and the eccentric Tim who is quoted here, and even wanted to change my last name to match Nicola's. I recently decided it was time to reread the Marlow--and Peter Wimsey--books because I've seen them mentioned on LJ and good books are always worth going back to.

So I borrowed Autumn Term this week and devoured it, realising just what a clever and beautiful book it is with its complex, well-drawn and understood characters. I even found words I picked up and used for a while (Nicola's "trimmensely" and "scudding" for running). I am saddened that The Marlows and the Traitor isn't in the library system, but I do remember that one quite well too: the fog, Nicola going widdershins round the lighthouse, Lawrie injured in hospital with a huge bandage on her head... I shall however work my way with delight through the ones I can borrow.

vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] kerravonsen: Grab the nearest book, open to page 123, find the fifth sentence. Then post the next three sentences.

From Autumn Term by Antonia Forest:

She said hopefully: "I thought, you see, that you might be Falsely Accused and that I, as the Headmistress's Niece, could Exert my Influence to Clear Your Name."
Despite herself, Nicola grinned.
"Well, I'm not and you can't and I don't want to talk about it."
I was named after Nicola Marlow, and when I was about 10 or 11 (younger than the twins anyway) I read Autumn Term and loved my namesake and the eccentric Tim who is quoted here, and even wanted to change my last name to match Nicola's. I recently decided it was time to reread the Marlow--and Peter Wimsey--books because I've seen them mentioned on LJ and good books are always worth going back to.

So I borrowed Autumn Term this week and devoured it, realising just what a clever and beautiful book it is with its complex, well-drawn and understood characters. I even found words I picked up and used for a while (Nicola's "trimmensely" and "scudding" for running). I am saddened that The Marlows and the Traitor isn't in the library system, but I do remember that one quite well too: the fog, Nicola going widdershins round the lighthouse, Lawrie injured in hospital with a huge bandage on her head... I shall however work my way with delight through the ones I can borrow.

vilakins: (books)

Yep, it's the latest book meme, copied from several people by now.

This is a list of the books most often tagged "unread" on LibraryThing. The rules are: bold what you have read, italicize what you started but didn't finish, and strike through what you couldn't stand. The number after each title is the number of LT users who used the tag of that book.
I've also added some comments.

The list )

Are there any you think I should read?

vilakins: (books)

Yep, it's the latest book meme, copied from several people by now.

This is a list of the books most often tagged "unread" on LibraryThing. The rules are: bold what you have read, italicize what you started but didn't finish, and strike through what you couldn't stand. The number after each title is the number of LT users who used the tag of that book.
I've also added some comments.

The list )

Are there any you think I should read?

vilakins: (books)

An interesting book rec meme from [livejournal.com profile] norda. I'm putting quite a few of the books listed so far on my reading list.

Once the shock of reading Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows for the fifth time in a row wears off, some readers may be wondering what they can read next. So why not start a meme of suggestions?

Copy and paste the directions and the list so far, and then add three (and only three) new fantasy or SF books to the top of the list that that those who enjoyed Harry Potter may also enjoy. Label the books as either YA (young adult, suitable for the younger fans of Harry Potter) or A (adult,suitable for the not-so-younger fans of Harry Potter). It will be understood that anything labelled YA is also recommended for A.
Here are mine:

[livejournal.com profile] vilakins recommends:

Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time (YA) Three children are transported through the galaxy via tesseract (a fold in space and time) to fight the dark cloud of evil that is threatening it and the earth. This work of powerful imagination opened my young mind to SF and stories of wonder, and I'm sure it would appeal to anyone who enjoyed Harry Potter. Oh and it starts with "It was a dark and stormy night..." :-)

Diana Wynne Jones's Howl's Moving Castle (YA) Set in a world of magic with a heroine who doesn't let being the eldest (and therefore unluckiest) child or being cursed into old age stop her.from going off to live life to the full.

Fred Saberhagen's Empire of the East (A) The book is in three parts, originally published separately (The Broken Lands, The Black Mountains, Ardneh's World), each with a different POV. The story takes place in a future where magic is the norm (and takes energy from the magic user; nice consistent world-building) and technology is viewed with scepticism. Its characters are complex, evolving, and memorable.

And here's the list so far )

vilakins: (books)

An interesting book rec meme from [livejournal.com profile] norda. I'm putting quite a few of the books listed so far on my reading list.

Once the shock of reading Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows for the fifth time in a row wears off, some readers may be wondering what they can read next. So why not start a meme of suggestions?

Copy and paste the directions and the list so far, and then add three (and only three) new fantasy or SF books to the top of the list that that those who enjoyed Harry Potter may also enjoy. Label the books as either YA (young adult, suitable for the younger fans of Harry Potter) or A (adult,suitable for the not-so-younger fans of Harry Potter). It will be understood that anything labelled YA is also recommended for A.
Here are mine:

[livejournal.com profile] vilakins recommends:

Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time (YA) Three children are transported through the galaxy via tesseract (a fold in space and time) to fight the dark cloud of evil that is threatening it and the earth. This work of powerful imagination opened my young mind to SF and stories of wonder, and I'm sure it would appeal to anyone who enjoyed Harry Potter. Oh and it starts with "It was a dark and stormy night..." :-)

Diana Wynne Jones's Howl's Moving Castle (YA) Set in a world of magic with a heroine who doesn't let being the eldest (and therefore unluckiest) child or being cursed into old age stop her.from going off to live life to the full.

Fred Saberhagen's Empire of the East (A) The book is in three parts, originally published separately (The Broken Lands, The Black Mountains, Ardneh's World), each with a different POV. The story takes place in a future where magic is the norm (and takes energy from the magic user; nice consistent world-building) and technology is viewed with scepticism. Its characters are complex, evolving, and memorable.

And here's the list so far )

vilakins: (books)

Before I go to bed (after far too much to eat at Café Jazz for our anniversary), here's another one of those book lists, this one from [livejournal.com profile] kernezelda.
The most significant SF and Fantasy Books of the Last 50 Years (1953-2002) according to the Science Fiction Book Club.

50 books; you know the drill )

vilakins: (books)

Before I go to bed (after far too much to eat at Café Jazz for our anniversary), here's another one of those book lists, this one from [livejournal.com profile] kernezelda.
The most significant SF and Fantasy Books of the Last 50 Years (1953-2002) according to the Science Fiction Book Club.

50 books; you know the drill )

vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)

From several people, the latest of whom is [livejournal.com profile] astrogirl2

  1. Grab the nearest book.
  2. Open the book to page 123.
  3. Find the fifth sentence.
  4. Post the text of the next 4 sentences on your LJ along with these instructions.
  5. Don't you dare dig for that "cool" or "intellectual" book in your closet! I know you were thinking about it! Just pick up whatever is closest.
The closest books are right on my desk: the four Molesworth books by Geoffrey Willans and Ronald Searle. Only one, Whizz for Atomms extends to 123 pages, unless you count Back in Jug Agane which just has 'THE END' on page 123.

Whizz for Atomms has only two sentences (or one, depending on how you look at it) on page 123 and they are:
Exit the wealthy worker 12345/c nye molesworth and all the machines go:

A puff-a grab - sizzle - grunt - scree - ow - gosh - sizzle - screeeeeee - ect.
This is from Molesworth's imagining of the future where he is a highly-paid worker in one of the 'automatick nuclear atommic factories which do all the work by themselves cheers cheers". This was written in 1956 when workers had a lot more power than they do now, and when people thought the biggest problem facing people in the future--the one we're living in--was how to fill their huge numbers of leisure hours.

What happened? People seem to be working harder than ever. Here in NZ we work the longest hours in the world, have fewer holidays than most (3-4 weeks with few public holidays) and people just put up with it. I've stepped back and work fewer hours than most (officially 30 hours a week but usually more like 35) and let me tell you, I would have no problem filling those leisure hours.

vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)

From several people, the latest of whom is [livejournal.com profile] astrogirl2

  1. Grab the nearest book.
  2. Open the book to page 123.
  3. Find the fifth sentence.
  4. Post the text of the next 4 sentences on your LJ along with these instructions.
  5. Don't you dare dig for that "cool" or "intellectual" book in your closet! I know you were thinking about it! Just pick up whatever is closest.
The closest books are right on my desk: the four Molesworth books by Geoffrey Willans and Ronald Searle. Only one, Whizz for Atomms extends to 123 pages, unless you count Back in Jug Agane which just has 'THE END' on page 123.

Whizz for Atomms has only two sentences (or one, depending on how you look at it) on page 123 and they are:
Exit the wealthy worker 12345/c nye molesworth and all the machines go:

A puff-a grab - sizzle - grunt - scree - ow - gosh - sizzle - screeeeeee - ect.
This is from Molesworth's imagining of the future where he is a highly-paid worker in one of the 'automatick nuclear atommic factories which do all the work by themselves cheers cheers". This was written in 1956 when workers had a lot more power than they do now, and when people thought the biggest problem facing people in the future--the one we're living in--was how to fill their huge numbers of leisure hours.

What happened? People seem to be working harder than ever. Here in NZ we work the longest hours in the world, have fewer holidays than most (3-4 weeks with few public holidays) and people just put up with it. I've stepped back and work fewer hours than most (officially 30 hours a week but usually more like 35) and let me tell you, I would have no problem filling those leisure hours.

30 books

9 Mar 2006 11:13 am
vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, 30 books every adult should have read, voted for by some British librarians. I take exception to being told I should have read anything, but I've managed over half of them. Admittedly a couple were because I was forced to at school. I still wish I hadn't been made to read Lord of the Flies at 14.

I've bolded the ones I've read and italicised the ones I've only read parts of.

Book list )

30 books

9 Mar 2006 11:13 am
vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, 30 books every adult should have read, voted for by some British librarians. I take exception to being told I should have read anything, but I've managed over half of them. Admittedly a couple were because I was forced to at school. I still wish I hadn't been made to read Lord of the Flies at 14.

I've bolded the ones I've read and italicised the ones I've only read parts of.

Book list )

vilakins: (books)

The Times 'top 100 novels of the past 83 years', copied from [livejournal.com profile] communicator. Bold = read, italics = started but not finished.

The list )



Hmm, 30%. That's better than I thought.

I must put in a plug for Snow Crash. Brilliant, exhilarating, and often very funny.

vilakins: (books)

The Times 'top 100 novels of the past 83 years', copied from [livejournal.com profile] communicator. Bold = read, italics = started but not finished.

The list )



Hmm, 30%. That's better than I thought.

I must put in a plug for Snow Crash. Brilliant, exhilarating, and often very funny.

Book list

1 Feb 2005 09:56 am
vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, China Mieville's list of 50 SF and fantasy stories a socialist must read (worth cheeking out for his comments). Three of my all-time favourites are on there:

Mikhail Bulgakov—The Master and Margarita
Ursula K. Le Guin—The Dispossessed
Mervyn Peake—The Gormenghast Novels
I've bolded the ones I've read.

50 SF and fantasy stories a socialist must read )

Book list

1 Feb 2005 09:56 am
vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, China Mieville's list of 50 SF and fantasy stories a socialist must read (worth cheeking out for his comments). Three of my all-time favourites are on there:

Mikhail Bulgakov—The Master and Margarita
Ursula K. Le Guin—The Dispossessed
Mervyn Peake—The Gormenghast Novels
I've bolded the ones I've read.

50 SF and fantasy stories a socialist must read )

vilakins: (stun)

Gacked from [livejournal.com profile] redstarrrobot:

Under the cut is the list of the top 110 books that have been banned based on political, religious, sexual, or social grounds. Go through and bold the ones that you've read, and italicize the ones that you've read part of. (And no, seeing the movie doesn't count.)

110 once-banned books )

vilakins: (stun)

Gacked from [livejournal.com profile] redstarrrobot:

Under the cut is the list of the top 110 books that have been banned based on political, religious, sexual, or social grounds. Go through and bold the ones that you've read, and italicize the ones that you've read part of. (And no, seeing the movie doesn't count.)

110 once-banned books )

vilakins: (stun)

From [livejournal.com profile] communicator, another 100 best list, this time of SF books. Yay for Neil Stephenson, Ursula Guin, and David Brin, but I'm surprised there's no Cordwainer Smith. The ones I've read are in bold and I enjoyed almost all of them; I'm not so fond of Heinlein despite a soft spot for The Moon is a Harsh Mistress as I really hate having someone else's philosophy or mores preached at me.
 
100 SF books )

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