vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)
This sounded good so I went on the waiting list for it at a the library. I picked it up yesterday.

SO DISAPPOINTED.

Crap style. Seriously bad writer. Short sentences. Choppy and disconnected. Many with no verbs. Present tense is OK for good writers. But not bad ones.

Did this guy have an editor? I ask myself.

Can't cope. Giving up.
vilakins: (hurley)

Since someone has this book on their reading list, I thought I'd finally get round to expressing my opinion of it before I take it to the SPCA charity shop.

I've enjoyed a lot of Robert Sheckley's classic work so when I saw this Star Trek novel, I grabbed it. However either the guy can't write any more or he's hired a very, very bad ghost writer, pretty much what I also suspect of Larry Niven who used to be a favourite.

This is a DS9 story featuring a beautiful alien called Allura. [rolls eyes] Read more if you dare. )

vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)

This is a slightly incomplete list as I know I read more swap books from the local second-hand bookshop but I can't remember them all. I've bolded my top three. The first is there because although I hated the murder aspect the description of the artist character is just brilliant; the other two are highly recommended although they're very different. As for the struck-out one, I've been meaning to post about that before it goes to the SPCA shop; next up!

The list )

vilakins: (books)

From [livejournal.com profile] nwhyte via [livejournal.com profile] communicator, the 'best' SF and fantasy novels of the 20th and 21st centuries from the Locus poll. Bold means I've read it, italic means I didn't finish it, and struck out means I didn't like it.

The list )



Feel free to rec me any of the unread ones provided they're not horror or unrelievedly bleak.

vilakins: (books with jasmin)

Remember the Itty-Bitty-Kitty Committee kitten who got adopted by Vorkosigan fans and renamed Miles (along with sister Cordelia)? There's a picture of him curled up beside the book Young Miles in this Itty-Bitty-Kitty Committee post. :-)

And I think I've either broken a toe or sprained it badly. OUCHIES! I did it at work when I slipped on some water in the kitchen and landed flat on my back (which I reported). I was OK but for that toe which must have hit the wall, I dunno. I suppose I'll have to go to A&E tomorrow and waste half a holiday-weekend Saturday getting it x-rayed only to be told to do what I've done and strap it to the next one. It's extremely painful to walk on though and I just want to check it's just the toe and I haven't damaged anything in the foot. :-P

vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (Default)

I wrote pitifully little in 2011 but I read about 80 books. I can only list 69 of them here because almost all came from the library and my on-line reading history isn't complete (for the first time ever): several just say "no information available". I have no idea what's missing. The Patrick O'Brian books I own, the entire collection bought second-hand, and I just inserted those at intervals.

I've bolded the ones I liked best, but really, I enjoyed all of them but one which I stopped reading fairly early on and therefore deleted from the list. I doubt I'll read as many this year I now have a Proper Job, but it's a good trade-off.

Feel free to ask me about any. :-)

List of books )

vilakins: (callyport telly)

I went to the doctor yesterday and now have antibiotics; I already feel a bit better. I hope I'm a lot better tomorrow at work. I don't think huge bouts of coughing give a good impression.

I need to take some books back to the library tomorrow. One of them is a Meg Langslow mystery by Donna Andrews. I enjoy these; they're light and funny and often geeky. Meg is a blacksmith who solves crime and has a very eccentric family, and various books have been set at renaissance faires, a fan convention (of a fictional fandom), and a computer games company. :-)

I mention this one because somehow no one proofread the back cover.

Front and back )



Another of the books is Patrick Rothfuss's The Wise Man's Fear, the sequel to The Name of the Wind. I'm loving this series for its characters, story, humour, adventure, and fascinating world. Just saying.

And I'm picking up another Mary Russell book, yay.

vilakins: (spock)

For those who wanted to know: this was a great book: a fun, quick read full of fannish geekiness, black humour, lots of Trek, and with a hero called Jim Pike. I've been feeling down this week and it made me laugh a lot. I'd recommend it to anyone (especially Star Trek fans) who doesn't have a deep attachment to Houston. ;-)

vilakins: (spock)

I went out to take some books back to the library and get some lunch and a coffee at the same time, and realised on my way that I'd left without a book to read over lunch. A bad habit, they say, but I don't care; I like a book if I'm eating alone. So I had a quick browse at the library (which was full of kids, it being school holidays which I also hadn't realised) and found Night of the Living Trekkies by Kevin David Anderson and Sam Stall, themselves Trekkies. There was a vid advertising this a while back and it looked like a lot of fun. Zombies aren't usually my thing, but at a Star Trek con and with added humour? They definitely are.

After lunch (and two chapters in, all chapter having BTW Star Trek episode names) I went to Farro to pick up eggs, bread, and yogurt--and they had imported Italian cannoli shells. You can't usually get those here so I grabbed a packet. All I have to do is make a lovely ricotta filling. I became addicted to those things in Sicily and the last ones I ate were in Melbourne some years ago. I'm meant to be eating more healthily but YUM!

vilakins: (books)

These are copied and pasted from my library reading history, and I added a few more books I either bought or borrowed from a friend. There are 76, 10 more than last year, and the usual mix of SF, fantasy, and light detective. Feel free to ask me about any.

[Edit] I bolded the ones I liked best.

List of books )

vilakins: (birman cat)

There's a Library Cat Map! And there are three library cats in Auckland; who knew? In a fairly close suburb is Xena, and Casper and Benjamin are over the harbour bridge. I may have to go and see Xena.

Perhaps there's a library cat near you. :-)

vilakins: (tabby cat)

I haven't been posting much lately because I've been feeling very down (for the usual reasons: no job, stuck at end of world etc etc) and can't think of much to say. So hey, here are seven American library cats for you, combining two of my favourite things.

Dewey is the most famous. In 1988, after being discovered in a frozen book return bin, Dewey Readmore Books became the official mascot of the Spencer Public Library in Iowa. He attended meetings, greeted patrons, and inspected every delivery until he died in 2006 at the age of 19. People drove hundreds of miles to meet him, and Library director Vicki Myron wrote a best-selling book, Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World. The first chapter is on the site and I first read it last year and it made me cry then. I did this time too. :-P

Squeakers lived on the campus of Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia, for ten years before becoming Willet Memorial Library’s library cat. She was about 23 years old when she died in 2008 which is damn good going. Squeakers spent most of her time in her later years sitting in a comfy chair near the library entrance, so she could see and inspect everyone who came in.

Nyx is amazing because she was born without eyes in 2008 yet gets around as easily as a sighted cat, sitting on the back of chairs, playing with toys, jumping on counters and desks, batting pens and pencils onto the floor, and unwrapping and eating librarian's lunches. Like a bat, she uses echolocation--she makes sounds and calculates how far they travel when they bounce back. She also has a super-loud purr (notice how she knows where the camera is) and is spoiled rotten by the staff and patrons with attention and toys.

Browser has lived at the Pine River Library in Minnesota since 2002. He even moved along with the library to their new building. There are photos of him on Flickr; skip the Halloween stuff and go to pages 5 and onwards.

Max was thought of as the Library Cat at the Hastings Branch Library in Pasadena from the early 80s until 1996, even though he never actually lived there. He lived nearby but visited the library so often the librarians issued him his own library card. Max would go and wait at the library door until someone opened it for him, and once inside, he ruled the roost. One day, Max’s visits stopped. The A concerned library staff investigated, and discovered that his family had moved away, taking Max with them. I hope he found another library.

Addison is the resident cat at the Nash Library at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. Their site has moved and I couldn't find anything about him on the new version, but here's a photo of him fund-raising for his favourite charity.

TLC (Top Library Cat) lives at the Broken Bow Public Library in Nebraska where he has a fireplace. And, it seems, his own reading matter and some Lolita sunglasses.

vilakins: (books)

I was cuddling a very affectionate Jasmin this morning when the courier pounded on the door. It was my ARC (advance reader's copy) of Conspiracy of Kings by Megan Whalen Turner which I'd won for suggesting a name for the series on the publisher's site. This is the fourth book in an excellent and witty fantasy series set in an AU medieval Greece which subverts a lot of the tropes, has twisty plots, fascinating characters, and wonderful unpredictability. I was delighted because I didn't expect it to arrive so quickly. Not only that, but there were two more books with it: one of poetry by people under 25, and a novel called Mistwood by Leah Cypess. It says on the back that fans of Kristin Cashore, Tamora Pierce, and , yes, Megan Whalen Turner will enjoy it. [adds more author names to rec notebook]

I was amazed not only to win something, but even to be eligible, which doesn't happen very often for people living here (and I'm looking at you, LibraryThing).

In other good news, autumn seems to have arrived this week. The days are still sunny and fine, but there's a refreshing chill to the air in the mornings, and the temperatures and humidity are way down. I shall enjoy the weather and ignore the prospect of the long, grey, wet, unrelieved-by-bright-spots winter that comes after. Yes.

vilakins: (books)

I wasn't going to do this because I just don't have good answers for a lot of the questions. But I decided I do have enough to make it worthwhile.

20 questions )

vilakins: (books)

For those interested in buying the Book Seat mentioned in my previous post, they have contact details for Australia, NZ, the UK, and the US on their site. There's also a colour range if you want to get a particular colour; see the bottom of this page.

I should add that the Book Seat is very light and hardly adds anything to the weight of the book. There's also a pocket on the back for glasses, mobile phone, or a snack bar or whatever you like, though I haven't used it. It could be useful for when you're reading outside; actually I have yet to try it in the hammock. :-D

vilakins: Vila with stars superimposed (vic tux)

We went to Whitcoulls bookshop last week so that I could spend some vouchers. I rarely buy books unless I know I'll reread them, so I looked at DVDs. There again, unless I want to watch them more than once, I'd rather rent them. I did fancy Doctor Who: War Games, and would have bought it too, but it was twice the price of the other old Who serials there--and two thirds the price of a whole season of new Who. So I wandered around disconsolately, wondering what I could use my vouchers on. I was sniggering at a book of Barack and Michelle Obama paper dolls when I saw it.

The Book Seat.

I've got a lot of use out of it already. It's a great design which holds a book firmly and still lets you turn the page easily, and I use it on the table when eating and on my lap. It stops my hands getting sore when holding up a large book for hours and I can drink tea and read. :-)

Let Vic show you how it works )

vilakins: (books)

I got this idea from [livejournal.com profile] shinyjenni: the list of books I've read in 2009. Actually, it's more accurately the list of books I've borrowed from the library as they provide a handy reading history which I've just copied and pasted. I've read a few more, but can't be brothered trying to remember them. Feel free to ask me about any.

66 books )

Discworld

6 Nov 2009 06:38 pm
vilakins: (books)

I should talk about the books I've read lately, but I'll just mention the Discworld ones.

Going Postal was great, and against all my expectations, mostly caused by his name, I liked Moist von Lipwig a lot. Yes, he did remind me of a certain thief with his particular brand of ethics and charm. :-)

Thud however I have mixed feelings about. Minor spoilers )



As an aside, Willikins' name still unnerves me every time I see it. He's a very cool character though, with his very correct and dignified butler speech combined with a deadly facility with anything he can turn into a weapon. :-) I'd like to read more of him. He and Vimes make an excellent team.

vilakins: (books)

I just finished Silver on the Tree, the last of the Dark is Rising series by Susan Cooper.

I'm not happy )



On to Going Postal. I'm sure from what I've heard that I'll enjoy that.

Monsters

15 Oct 2009 06:01 pm
vilakins: The word chocolate in many different languages (chocolate)

I read China Mieville's The Scar a couple of weeks ago, and though I've been able to recognise the mythical origins of several Bas Lag species like the vodyanoi (Russian for watery ones), I thought Mieville's avanc had its own original name.

I'm now reading Silver on the Tree, the last of Susan Cooper's Dark in Rising series, one I never came across as a kid, and whaddaya know, here on page 69, Bran says that "Arthur is supposed to have pulled an afanc, a monster, out of a lake up there," and since F is said as V in Welsh, I recognised it. Cool! I'll have to look up some of the other creatures.

Speaking of F being V, it wasn't till I came back--and it had fallen apart--that I realised that I'd gone all round Wales with my Fila shoulder bag. I might have to find another one so I can be fannish in Welsh. ;-)

vilakins: (books)

I didn't post about the annual "garage sale" in a local church hall. I didn't get anything terribly exciting, the biggest purchase being one of my canvas tote bags packed with books for $20. These included several Stanislaw Lems, some early Flashmans, which I'll read again, and assorted other stuff like a guy's description of hitch-hiking round Ireland with a small fridge and some weird stuff Greg chose, like an Austrian professor's opinion of England written in the 1930s.

Oh yes, and two ancient Jerrard Tickel books because Greg was amused at the title of one, Villa Mimosa. The other one's Appointment with Venus which I remember reading when I was about 13 and thinking it was both funny and exciting (kidnapping a pregnant cow in the wartime Channel Islands) but which turned out to be more serious than I remembered--and a lot more sexist and racist.

Apart from that, I got a green and blue "looking" cat which was displayed uncomfortably perched on its ends instead of over the edge of a shelf, a hand-painted Italian plate for 50 cents, and a yummy crepe with brown sugar and lemon, a welcome addition to the usual sausage sizzles they have at these things and which I avoid.

Looking cat with Vic, plate, and bonus cubs )

vilakins: (books)

I've now had two of the three books on my library waiting list (outstanding is Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and I'm working my way up that queue).

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer at first made me laugh quite a lot, then made me cry, and it's been a while since a book did that. It's a lot darker than I'd expected in a couple of places (and even darker than the Enemy at the Door series about the Guernsey occupation. I was also amazed that an American author wrote a book so flawlessly English; it's beautifully done, and it's a pity she didn't live to see how popular it is. I do highly rec this one: the characters are vivid, eccentric, and loveable, and all write in different style. It also actually made me want to read some of the authors mentioned.

I just finished The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley. Flavia de Luce is a fun narrator, but though I can believe she'd have an extensive chemical knowledge given her private lab, her obsession with the subject, and no apparent need to go to school, I can't believe an 11-year-old would have that sort of vocabulary and writing style. Also, unlike Shaffer, Bradley didn't bother to get his text Brit-picked, so he has a lot of North American intrusions into his 50s England, like poison ivy, tobogganing, and pigtails (I'm sure Bradley meant plaits) and several stray gottens. Also, Flavia would not refer to an object as cunning, nor would Dogger, a British ex-soldier, ever use "copacetic", an odd American word I had to look up a few months ago. It's a pity, because those slips threw me out of the narrative--and I'm not even British. Apart from that though, it's a fun story, well told. I decided that Flavia grew up and emigrated to Canada, and wrote using her adult vocabulary. :-P

In other news, since reccer [livejournal.com profile] sallymn probably didn't read my last post, I've finally seen an ep of Inspector Montalbano. I like him! I'll have to see if I can buy the season 2 DVDs. I also saw New Tricks. I do love those old guys.

vilakins: (screen)

Craving WW2 stuff after finishing Enemy at the Gate and reading Enigma, we've been watching a documentary about Bletchley Park, Station X. It's excellent, and I'm enjoying the interviews with people on both sides. After that, we'll see the Derek Jacobi play about Turing, Breaking the Code.

Last night however, we saw the first part of three of The Making of Blake's 7, the documentary series B7E (I think) stopped them adding to the DVDs as extras. It's amazingly good, made in 1999, I think: very informative, and interviewees include Terry Nation (some of these interviews must have been made a lot earlier), Gareth Thomas, Michael Keating, Jan Chappell, Jacqueline Pearce, Chris Boucher, Vere Lorimer, Matt Irvin, David Maloney, and several others. I don't think it was ever shown because there's a time counter running in the top left corner, but it's properly edited and, unusually, actually kept Greg watching, it's so interesting. It's well worth seeing. This part covered S1, and the next two S2 and S3. They never made one for S4, but that's no great loss. ;-) For those interested, it's on The Box, like the others.

What else? I went out to dinner (delicious Italian) on Saturday night, I've made Greg a very cool late birthday present scarf, and I'm reading Pompeii by Robert Harris, which is as good as I suspected it would be.

vilakins: (screen)

Craving WW2 stuff after finishing Enemy at the Gate and reading Enigma, we've been watching a documentary about Bletchley Park, Station X. It's excellent, and I'm enjoying the interviews with people on both sides. After that, we'll see the Derek Jacobi play about Turing, Breaking the Code.

Last night however, we saw the first part of three of The Making of Blake's 7, the documentary series B7E (I think) stopped them adding to the DVDs as extras. It's amazingly good, made in 1999, I think: very informative, and interviewees include Terry Nation (some of these interviews must have been made a lot earlier), Gareth Thomas, Michael Keating, Jan Chappell, Jacqueline Pearce, Chris Boucher, Vere Lorimer, Matt Irvin, David Maloney, and several others. I don't think it was ever shown because there's a time counter running in the top left corner, but it's properly edited and, unusually, actually kept Greg watching, it's so interesting. It's well worth seeing. This part covered S1, and the next two S2 and S3. They never made one for S4, but that's no great loss. ;-) For those interested, it's on The Box, like the others.

What else? I went out to dinner (delicious Italian) on Saturday night, I've made Greg a very cool late birthday present scarf, and I'm reading Pompeii by Robert Harris, which is as good as I suspected it would be.

vilakins: (books)

I haven't been posting much lately. I haven't even reviewed the last two Pretender eps I watched a while back, which I'll try to get round to today. I've been feeling rather blah, with nothing much interesting to say about my life. I have a few hours of underpaid work a week which is so crap and boring I don't want to talk about it, and this is very discouraging when I once thought I'd never be out of proper work with my degree and other qualifications. :-(

So I've been taking refuge in the world of books, one of the best escapes I know. I've read the first in the Gentleman Bastard series, The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch and thoroughly enjoyed it, though it was a little slow to start. Great characters and world building, and Lynch does seasons and months on another planet right.

I've just finished Enigma by Robert Harris, another one I really enjoyed: code breaking and skulduggery at Bletchley Park, a fascinating place I visited in 2004. [livejournal.com profile] azdak, Turing was only in the book briefly, at King's College with his teddy bear Porgy, then he was off in the US and only mentioned in passing; he certainly wasn't misrepresented. I can hardly remember the film, but the book is definitely worth reading for the atmosphere and conditions at Bletchley. I've decided I wouldn't have wanted to be there with the sexism that relegated brilliant women to clerks while men got to be cryptanalysts.

I've just started The Truth by Terry Pratchett as I felt like something light. After that, it's back to Robert Harris andPompeii, then his other Roman books eventually.

What else? Oh yes, Jasmin went to the eye specialist yesterday for a final check-up (which is why it rained (it always rains when I go there) and she's healed up amazingly well. She and Ashley are getting quite big,and Ashey's a year old in a couple of weeks. They're both very cute and playful and extra cuddly now the weather's getting cooler. Right now all three girls are curled up in their fleecy snugglers in the TV room, and Vic's upstairs on the spare bed. :-)

vilakins: (books)

I haven't been posting much lately. I haven't even reviewed the last two Pretender eps I watched a while back, which I'll try to get round to today. I've been feeling rather blah, with nothing much interesting to say about my life. I have a few hours of underpaid work a week which is so crap and boring I don't want to talk about it, and this is very discouraging when I once thought I'd never be out of proper work with my degree and other qualifications. :-(

So I've been taking refuge in the world of books, one of the best escapes I know. I've read the first in the Gentleman Bastard series, The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch and thoroughly enjoyed it, though it was a little slow to start. Great characters and world building, and Lynch does seasons and months on another planet right.

I've just finished Enigma by Robert Harris, another one I really enjoyed: code breaking and skulduggery at Bletchley Park, a fascinating place I visited in 2004. [livejournal.com profile] azdak, Turing was only in the book briefly, at King's College with his teddy bear Porgy, then he was off in the US and only mentioned in passing; he certainly wasn't misrepresented. I can hardly remember the film, but the book is definitely worth reading for the atmosphere and conditions at Bletchley. I've decided I wouldn't have wanted to be there with the sexism that relegated brilliant women to clerks while men got to be cryptanalysts.

I've just started The Truth by Terry Pratchett as I felt like something light. After that, it's back to Robert Harris andPompeii, then his other Roman books eventually.

What else? Oh yes, Jasmin went to the eye specialist yesterday for a final check-up (which is why it rained (it always rains when I go there) and she's healed up amazingly well. She and Ashley are getting quite big,and Ashey's a year old in a couple of weeks. They're both very cute and playful and extra cuddly now the weather's getting cooler. Right now all three girls are curled up in their fleecy snugglers in the TV room, and Vic's upstairs on the spare bed. :-)

vilakins: (books)

I loved his first one, Aberystwyth Mon Amour--so blackly funny, as is the second in the series--but Malcolm Pryce doesn't like cats much, does he? I'm only about 30 pages into Last Tango in Aberystwythand he's already drowned a mother and kittens in a throw-away comment and run over another cat in passing. There isn't even the slightest plot reason for it. If he wants to show what a mean and violent society his AU Wales is, there are ways I'd find less repellent. I mean, it doesn't fit with the eccentric deadpan humour of the rest.

Otherwise: cool series and I love the weird stuff he makes up like gossip contests and toffee apple dens.

I also want to know how to pronounce the name Ionawr? Is it like Iona (eye-owna) or Yona?

vilakins: (books)

I loved his first one, Aberystwyth Mon Amour--so blackly funny, as is the second in the series--but Malcolm Pryce doesn't like cats much, does he? I'm only about 30 pages into Last Tango in Aberystwythand he's already drowned a mother and kittens in a throw-away comment and run over another cat in passing. There isn't even the slightest plot reason for it. If he wants to show what a mean and violent society his AU Wales is, there are ways I'd find less repellent. I mean, it doesn't fit with the eccentric deadpan humour of the rest.

Otherwise: cool series and I love the weird stuff he makes up like gossip contests and toffee apple dens.

I also want to know how to pronounce the name Ionawr? Is it like Iona (eye-owna) or Yona?

vilakins: (books)

I heard a transformer blew up in Melbourne and a lot of people are without power in the heat. I hope [livejournal.com profile] kerravonsen and anyone else in the area is all right.

I now have bronchitis; oh joy. The antibiotics the doctor gave me right at the start clearly didn't work at all. I'm supposed to go and see a contracting agency who used to get me work (all their staff have changed and they don't know me any more) but I can't feeling like this, and hacking disgustingly.

I am consoling myself with books.

I recently read An Assembly Such As This by Pamela Aidan; an account from Darcy's POV of the events of Pride and Prejudice, and the first in a trilogy. It's well written in the style of Austen (except for rampant said-phobia which Austen never suffered from; she never used "intoned" and "supplied" etc) and entertaining enough for me to want to read the other two. It was however full of the most terrible typos, spelling mistakes, and punctuation errors (e.g. "Here, here" instead of "Hear, hear", apostrophes in plurals, "who's" / "whose and "its" / "it's" being swapped). Was this even edited? Shame on you, Wytherngate Press.

I also enjoyed Sherlock Holmes: the missing years by Tibetan author Jamyang Norbu, which was recced on someone else's LJ. It covers the adventures of Holmes in India and Tibet in the two missing years after he was assumed dead, and is a ripping yarn with a touch of the Indiana Jones, told by Hurree Chunder Mookerjee, the Babu of Kipling's Kim. He makes an amusing and fun narrator (his Holmes is very in character too), and on the strength of this book, I've decided to reread Kim.

I'm also rereading the Earthsea Quartet, and am still slowly working my way through the Discworld novels, the last one being Carpe Jugulum, which was fun but not up to the level of a good City Watch book.

vilakins: (books)

I heard a transformer blew up in Melbourne and a lot of people are without power in the heat. I hope [livejournal.com profile] kerravonsen and anyone else in the area is all right.

I now have bronchitis; oh joy. The antibiotics the doctor gave me right at the start clearly didn't work at all. I'm supposed to go and see a contracting agency who used to get me work (all their staff have changed and they don't know me any more) but I can't feeling like this, and hacking disgustingly.

I am consoling myself with books.

I recently read An Assembly Such As This by Pamela Aidan; an account from Darcy's POV of the events of Pride and Prejudice, and the first in a trilogy. It's well written in the style of Austen (except for rampant said-phobia which Austen never suffered from; she never used "intoned" and "supplied" etc) and entertaining enough for me to want to read the other two. It was however full of the most terrible typos, spelling mistakes, and punctuation errors (e.g. "Here, here" instead of "Hear, hear", apostrophes in plurals, "who's" / "whose and "its" / "it's" being swapped). Was this even edited? Shame on you, Wytherngate Press.

I also enjoyed Sherlock Holmes: the missing years by Tibetan author Jamyang Norbu, which was recced on someone else's LJ. It covers the adventures of Holmes in India and Tibet in the two missing years after he was assumed dead, and is a ripping yarn with a touch of the Indiana Jones, told by Hurree Chunder Mookerjee, the Babu of Kipling's Kim. He makes an amusing and fun narrator (his Holmes is very in character too), and on the strength of this book, I've decided to reread Kim.

I'm also rereading the Earthsea Quartet, and am still slowly working my way through the Discworld novels, the last one being Carpe Jugulum, which was fun but not up to the level of a good City Watch book.

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